S.H.O.K.A.
Soken Hohan's Orthodox Karate-Do Association

S.H.O.K.A. was founded by Shihan Charles D. Garrett II, being a direct student of Soken Sensei.
The idea for forming  the association, was born on the 29th of December, 1998, and it was officially formed and named by the January 1, 1999.  The purpose of this association is to preserve the kata and teachings of Soken Sensei as they were taught to the Yozadake Seito and Shihan Garrett by, Soken Sensei.  Also, training at the same time under Soken Sensei, were Mr. Don Flood, Mr. Woody Lyons and Mr. Melchior Tecson, all of which learned the same curriculum from Soken, which, contrary to some claims was not a sport system, but an old Okinawan tradition emphasizing deadly combat oriented techniques...not scoring points     
 
It is the hope of  SHOKA that even in the next 200 or 300 years, the kata and teachings of the Matsumura Family will be intact and available to serious karateka who are willing to carry them on.  There will never be a "Soke", "Judan" or "Hanshi" in this association as our purpose is not to "invent" a new variation of Soken Sensei's system.  Even in death Soken Sensei remains the Grandmaster of the Matsumura Seito system and out of respect for him and his teachings no one shall surpass his position.  However, the door remains open for a certain Okinawan who happens to be an excellent Matsumura Seito practitioner to head up the association at anytime.  We do not claim to teach everthing he knew.  Yet to truly teach what he was serious about in 1970-1972.  Nor that Shihan Garrett to be the Great practitioner, but yes a Seito and follower of what he was taught from Basics up and through Rohai kata.
 
There are many different versions of the Matsumura system being taught today, by many different people. 
Politics seems to rule, in most of these cases.  So many others make claims, of this and the different groups are always arguing and bickering.  Soken Hohan's Orthodox Karate-Do Association hopes to bring together, all of those who have trained in the Matsumura Tradition, without all of this political content.  Rank isn't important; what is important is sharing, so that the tradition can be carried on for future generations.  We need to put all of our energy into coming together and preserving the Matsumura Legacy, not arguing over who should be in charge.  Soken Sensei would have wanted it that way.  If one TRULY studied with Hohan Soken Sensei, they would also want to work this way.  Regretfully said "to many have only been talk, and not truth".   Talking with Sempei  Melchior Tecson, "Hohan Soken was a giver and shared his arts unconditionally".  If those that studied with him and learned  his way, they  will JOIN with us, even if its just to SHARE.     
 
If you would like more information on membership in SHOKA
please feel free to call Sensei Charles Garrett at (916) 920-8245
we look forward to hearing from you. 
There is no questions you can not ask, we have nothing to hide, just to share!
Matsumura Seito Shorin Ryu Kata(s)
Naihanchi
Naihanchi kata is taught in a series of three forms.  It is a rather old kata practiced by most styles of Shuri and Tomari lineage.  Soken Sensei said in the 1972 interview that Naihanchi was the name of a Chinese man who was living on Okinawa.  The kata was most likely either made by him, or made from techiniques and concepts taught by him.  Some have attributed the origin of Naihanchi with a Chinese man named Ason, who Matsumura Sokon is known to have trained with.  Perhaps this is the man Soken Sensei was referring to.  Some say that Naihanchi Sho and Ni were originally one kata.  After learning this kata from Matsumura Sokon, Itosu Yasutsune split it up into two forms and added the third variation.  It utilizes the Kiba Dachi (horse stance) and the movement is side to side.  There are a few different reasons given for the side to side movement of the kata; fighting on a rice patty dike fighting with your back against a wall, or simply that it's a basic pattern that is easy for beginners to learn.  All of which are probably correct.  Also, change body concepts are contained in the side to side stepping.  The name has been translated to mean either "Iron Horse" or "Holding Your Ground", both names referring to the rooted stance.  When Funakoshi Gichin introduced karate to mainland Japan, he changed the name to Tekki, which means "Horse Riding", also referring to the horse stance used in the kata.
Pinan
The Pinan katas, 3, 4 and 5 were divised between the years 1900 and 1907 by Itosu Yasutsune, a student of Matsumura Sokon.  Some say that Matsumura developed Pinan Sho and Ni from a series of two old Chinese forms called Channan, and later, his student Itosu developed Pinan San, Yon and Go from movements from the Channan series and the Kusanku kata.  Others say that Itosu made all five of the kata from the Channan and Kusanku kata.  In any case, Soken Sensei taught at least four of these kata and probably the fifth one too.  The name translates as "Peacefull Mind".  When Funakoshi introduced karate to Japan, he changed the name to Heian, which is the Japanese rendering of the same name.
Pinan
The Pinan katas, 3, 4 and 5 were divised between the years 1900 and 1907 by Itosu Yasutsune, a student of Matsumura Sokon.  Some say that Matsumura developed Pinan Sho and Ni from a series of two old Chinese forms called Channan, and later, his student Itosu developed Pinan San, Yon and Go from movements from the Channan series and the Kusanku kata.  Others say that Itosu made all five of the kata from the Channan and Kusanku kata.  In any case, Soken Sensei taught at least four of these kata and probably the fifth one too.  The name translates as "Peacefull Mind".  When Funakoshi introduced karate to Japan, he changed the name to Heian, which is the Japanese rendering of the same name.
Pinan
The Pinan katas, 3, 4 and 5 were divised between the years 1900 and 1907 by Itosu Yasutsune, a student of Matsumura Sokon.  Some say that Matsumura developed Pinan Sho and Ni from a series of two old Chinese forms called Channan, and later, his student Itosu developed Pinan San, Yon and Go from movements from the Channan series and the Kusanku kata.  Others say that Itosu made all five of the kata from the Channan and Kusanku kata.  In any case, Soken Sensei taught at least four of these kata and probably the fifth one too.  The name translates as "Peacefull Mind".  When Funakoshi introduced karate to Japan, he changed the name to Heian, which is the Japanese rendering of the same name.
Passai
Passai kata is taught in two variations, Sho and Dai.  It is a very old kata of many different versions.  It was originally one form and later split into two kata for teaching purposes.  The form is taught in most Okinawan, Japanese and Korean styles that are of Shuri and Tomari lineage.  The name translates as "To Penetrate a Fortress" or "To Breach or Break Through".  Funakoshi changed the name to Bassai, which is the Japanese rendering of the same name.  Bassai is also the name used in Korean styles.  This is the first of the katas to have three time variations within kata.  Instead of steady no pace change.  Great KI awareness concepts evolve from soft slow motion forms.
Gojushiho
Gojushiho is an old kata that is mentioned in the Bubishi (Old Chinese martial arts text).  The name means "Fifty four steps" and is referred to in the Bubishi as "Fifty-four Steps of the Black Tiger".  The kata really shows the Chinese influences with it's many circular hand movements, finger striking techniques and fluid nature.  Some versions of the kata contain a "drunken" staggering type movement, although, this movement doesn't occur in the Matsumura version.
Chinto
Chinto is an old kata, reportedly introduced by Matsumura Sokon.  Legend has it that many, many years ago, a Chinese man named Chinto was shipwrecked and washed ashore on Okianwa.  He took refuge in a cave and began to steal food from the local villages so he wouldn't starve to death.  When the king got word of this he sent Matsumura Sokon, his greatest warrior, to dispose of the thief.  Afteralready sending 2 village samurai unsucessfully.   Matsumura searched for him and found him.  They engaged in battle but were matched.  Neither of them could gain an advantage.  Supposeably lasting almost an hour duration.   Chinto fled back into his cave.  Matsumura returned to the king and told him that the thief had been dealt with.  Later, Matsumura returned to the cave with some food and befriended Chinto.  They began to train together and exchanged concepts and techniques.  Matsumura later developed a kata from the concepts he learned and named the kata Chinto in honor of his friend.  The Japanese call this kata Gankaku, which means "Crane standing on a rock".
Kusanku
Kusanku is a very old kata.  Some consider it to be one of the oldest kata of Okinawan karate.  It is practiced by most Okinawan and Japanese karate styles of Shuri and Tomari lineage and is also practiced by some Korean styles.  Soken Sensei has been quoted as saying that Kusanku is the most important kata of Matsumura karate, and that when he was training under Nabei, they would practice it with kanzashi (hairpins) in their hands.  The kata was reportedly developed by Tode Sakugawa from concepts and techniques that he learned from a Chinese military attache named Kusanku, for which the kata was named.  This kata is referred to as Kwanku or Kanku in Japanese karate, which means "To View the Sky"..obviously referring to the opening movement of kata where one places his hands together to form a triangle and raises them up as if he is looking at the sky through the triangle.
Rohai
Rohai kata is another very old kata.  It's originator is unknown, but it is believed to have been developed around the area of Tomari Village.  Soken Sensei is said to have taught three variations of this kata, Ichi, Ni and San.  Yet none of the Yozadake Seito heard Soken Sensei say anything about ni or san rohai katas.  Maybe they were Kise's addition to the Matsumura family?  All very similar.  The name means "Vision of a Crane" or "To View a Heron", referring to the one legged crane stance posture which occurs three times in the kata.  It is called Meikyo in Japanese karate which means "To Polish a Mirror", referring to the circular motion of the hands which also occurs three times in the kata.  Another interpretation of the name refers to the opening of the kata, in which the hands held in a position as if one were holding a small mirror and looking into it
KOBUDO
Soken Sensei also taught the weapons art of Okinawa known as Kobujitsu or Kobudo.  It is said that Soken Sensei did not learn kobudo from his uncle Nabei, because Nabei was not familiar with them.  So he sought instruction from other teachers, namely Komesu Ushi No Tanmei and Chikin Kraka (Tsuken Mantaka).  He learned the Chikin Bo kata(also known as Tsuken Bo) from Chikin Kraka, and between these two teachers learned many more weapons.  The general concensus says that Soken Sensei taught Bo, Sai, Tuifa, Kama, Kusarigama, Nunchaku and Suruchin.  However, from 1970-72 Shihan Charles Garrett learned Chikin Bo, Soken No Sai, Soken No Tuifa, and Soken No Naginata.  In 1972 Soken began teaching Mr. Garrett basic techniques with the kama and the boken, but he wasn't there long enough to learn any kata with these weapons.  Nishihira Sensei has said that the only kobudo kata that Soken Sensei actually learned was Chikin Bo, and that he never learned any kata with the rest of the weapons.  Rather, he merely learned how to use the weapons.  However it is known that he taught kata with the other weapons.  The other weapons that he taught all bear his name, so what Nishihira Sensei probably meant by this is that he only learned Chikin Bo kata, and the other kata he taught were originated by him.  In the 1972 interview Soken Sensei comments on his weapons kata.  He says that when he first started teaching, he would teach someone a weapon kata such as tuifa.  They would say "Sensei, what is the name of this kata?"  Soken Sensei would say "No name just tuifa kata".  After many occurances of this Soken Sensei finally decided to just attach his name to the kata so that they would have a name.
 
Call Today!
Tel.: +1 (916) 920-8245
SHOKA
10 DAKOTA COURT
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 95833